What Is The Number Before Infinity

What is the number before infinity

Some might wonder, what is the number before infinity? To answer that question, you first need to have an understanding of what infinity actually is, and where the word is used.

So first, we will begin explaining what infinity truly is, before we answer the question: what is the number before infinity.

It can be hard to get your head around what infinity actually is and how big it might be we you think of it. In general, infinity means that there is no end to something, it just goes on and on. Keep on reading to learn more about this question.

What is infinity?

Infinity can be interpreted as a concept of something that is limitless, without end, and without bounds. In 1655, English mathematician John Wallis invented the symbol ∞ for infinity, and it became the symbol for infinity ever since.

It is possible to distinguish three main types of infinity: the mathematical type, the physical type, and the metaphysical type.

There is an infinite number of mathematical infinities, for instance as the number of points on a continuous line or even as the number of counting numbers in an endless sequence: 1, 2, 3,….

In physics, a spatial and temporal concept of infinity arises when we ask if stars can have an infinite number or if the universe will always exist.

A metaphysical discussion of the nature of God or the Absolute may include a question about whether an ultimate being must be infinite, and whether lesser entities may also be infinite.

Mathematical infinity

What Is The Number Before Infinity

Ancient Greeks used the term Apeiron to express infinity, which had connotations of being unbounded, indefinite, undefined, and without form.

Infinity makes its first appearance in mathematics when a ratio between the diagonal and the side of a square is taken into consideration.

In the early days of Pythagoras (c. 580–500 BCE) and his followers, they thought that everything in the universe could be explained by an arrangement in which just whole numbers (0, 1, 2, 3,…) were mentioned.

But they were bewildered to find that the diagonal and side of a square are incommensurable — that is, they cannot both be expressed as whole-number multiples of some unit (or standard of measurement).

This discovery in modern mathematics is explained by the statement that the ratio is irrational, which essentially means that it represents the limit of an endless, non-repeating decimal series.

Suppose that a square has sides of length 1 and a diagonal of length 1. The diagonal is a Square root of√2, written as 1.414213562…, where the ellipsis (…) indicates an endless sequence of digits with no pattern.  

Physical infinity

There have been a variety of theories regarding three-dimensional space. Although some believe that space is infinite, cosmologists generally believe that space is curved in such a way that it is finite but unbounded-almost like the surface of a sphere.

The universe is sometimes viewed as being embedded in a higher-dimensional superspace that is potentially infinite in size. In some theories of cosmology, the universe may indeed be embedded in this superspace.

The big-bang theory, which holds that the universe originates from an explosion, leads most cosmologists to believe that the universe has a finitely long past, but whether it will continue to exist indefinitely remains to be seen.

It has been suggested that the “infinite future” view assumes that space will continue in the same way it now does, with galaxies drifting farther and farther apart, stars consuming themselves to dust, and subsequent particles decaying into electromagnetic radiation.

On the other hand, the “finite future” theory states that a cosmic catastrophe will destroy the entire universe at some future definite time that may be unimaginable: space may collapse to a point, or perhaps a parallel sheet of space (called a “brane”) will collide with our universe, erasing it all.

The possibility exists that the end of the universe might be followed by the birth of a new universe in any of the catastrophic finite time scenarios. Thus, it might be argued that the future may in some sense be infinite after all.

Metaphysical infinity – What is the number before infinity?

Metaphysics and theology are perhaps the most familiar contexts in which infinity is discussed. In the realms of mathematics, physics, and metaphysics, Cantor introduced the distinction between the infinities.

From Plotinus (205–270 CE) forward, all theologians and metaphysicians have assumed that the Absolute is infinite, even though Plato considered it to be finite.

There is no clear consensus on what is meant by “the Absolute”, since that, as it turns out, depends upon the philosopher in question; it might be taken to mean God, an overarching universal mind, or simply the class of all possible thoughts.

What is the number before infinity then?

So, now that we learned a bit more about infinity, can we answer the question: What is the number before infinity?

Yes, we can. The fact is that, and this can be a bit mind-boggling, the number before infinity is actually infinity also. So why is this?

Imagine that you had a list of all the whole numbers: 1, 2, 3, etc. It is impossible to end this list because there will always be one to add to each number. There is no entry for infinity on the list since it is not a whole number – but the number of entries on the list is infinity.

Some might wonder, what is the number before infinity? To answer that question, you first need to have an understanding of what infinity actually is, and where the word is used. So first, we will begin explaining what infinity truly is, before we answer the question: what is the number…

Some might wonder, what is the number before infinity? To answer that question, you first need to have an understanding of what infinity actually is, and where the word is used. So first, we will begin explaining what infinity truly is, before we answer the question: what is the number…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.